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. >> ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel and our great country, and it's almost a mystical relationship when you think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it's due to the fact that this is not just jewish support, we're only 2% of the population in the united states. it's because we have shared values, shared enemies, and islamic terrorism. that many people in the united states view israel as the holy land not just jews but non-jews as well. there's a remarkable time when there is so much polarization between the republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> what -- the future of the jews, is your book title provocative in any way? do you mean to be? >> i mean it to be. the question is can of peopl
basis on which to determine british policy on this though? when the foreign secretary understands statehood is not a gift to be given, but a right to be acknowledged. i won the foreign secretary of the united kingdom abstains tomorrow, it will not be a measure of our growing influence. it would be a confirmation of our growing irrelevance to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe i believe will be the search for peace across europe i believe will be an overwhelming majority of 102 members of the general assembly voting for enhanced observer status for palestinians. that can and must send a signal to the palestinians that diplomatic effort in the path of politics or not the path of pockets of violence to his two state solution. let's be honest, in recent days, hamas in the midst of the conflict with israel welcome the secretary general, prime minister v-chip comforter set turkey, iraq, jordan come the pulse to any authority, saudi arabia
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
the lugar energy initiative, he has combined his foreign policy and agricultural expertise to promote policies to spur economic growth. mr. president, in the dark days following the attacks of september 11, 2001, senator lugar set forth a set of principles to guide our nation in these difficult times. the lugar doctrine calls upon the united states to use all of its military, diplomatic, and economic power without question to ensure that life-threatening weapons of mass destruction everywhere are accounted, contained, and hopefully destroyed. end quote. in addition, the lugar doctrine asserts that america should encourage democratic institutions and decrease reliance on foreign energy sources. these accomplishments and so many more stem from a profound intellect combined with characteristic. there's nothing i love more than to hear dick lugar give a tutorial on any country in the world, and he can do so; he can talk knowledgeably and teach us about any country in the world. that is the depth of his experience, his knowledge, his expertise. dick has also always been a voice of reason i
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today who has played such a fundamental role over the last several years. been part of literally every negotiation that has taken place. he still an optimist, so i think that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in
. like, you can't do it all. we had an atlantic cover story weaselly that wasn't about foreign policy. the title was why women still can't have it all. but it does -- can america still have it all? and in the way, has framed that, the answer is no, that there are limits. >> steve, even as we rebalanced to the asia-pacific we have continued are deep engagement with the region, other countries just as if, there's one example in our defense strategic guidance put out in january talked about having to become a net provider of security. i think you see that over the last couple of decades, and you see ongoing today. we will continue to be engaged in a obvious of the middle east and north africa and globally. the united states is a global power. it is not a zero-sum game, particularly when you look at the importance of alliances and partnerships, both within the asia-pacific and globally. our objective is to continue to strengthen those alliances and partnerships, and if we, if i can pivot to the topic of china, to build on the areas of cooperation that we have across the border, including
, but foreign policy purpose. it allows me to relate and hopefully, i think, apply public policy. why do i care about programs for student loans? because i wouldn't be able to gone to college without the. i think that's good. that's a good thing. that's why we have the representatives for the public. >> senator, you have said, i heard you say that actually, yeah, communities quite conservative social issues, fiscally, as is the african-american community in a lot of ways. both communities projected your party -- rejected your party. beyond immigration reforms, what kind of policy should the party put forth? like for instance, there was a lot of talk during the campaign about children of immigrants. what else can they offer? can you get that by the right lines of our? >> first of all i think the issues that appeal to minorities at the same that appeal to everybody else. there are two things -- what's the number of an issue that hovers over us? that's growing opportunity gaps between hopes and dreams of many of our people have and the chance to publish it, particularly to be able to get to that c
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10